28. Assembly... tool kit, headlight & bits and pieces..

A blow by blow photographic account of chopping from stock to chop... This projcet has been given its own forum due to the large number of photos it contains making uploading slow for those of you still on "dial up".
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Prof
Founder, Choppers Australia
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Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2005 3:54 pm
Location: Willunga, South Australia
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28. Assembly... tool kit, headlight & bits and pieces..

Post by Prof » Fri Apr 27, 2007 12:32 am

Bike assembly so far and getting into the wiring...
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Here's a trick on the oil tank... Although I blew through all openings with compressed air after draining out the POR 15, there was still enough in the breather outlet (pictured) to collect as a blob and block it. A considerable amount of energy using mig wire, pliers and torch wa needed to remove the now hard blob. This resulted in loose bits in the bottom of the tank and the challenge... how to get it all out. Solution? a piece of wire with the tip coated in grease. Half a dozen pokes with the grease tipped wire using a torch to see all was removed did the trick. You can see the bits on the end of the wire to left of filler...

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Speedo mod...
Speedo is off a lowrider which had speedo and tacho in dash on tank. Trip meter winder knob on the original is on the end of a flexible drive... no good for this set up... In this pic, the knob has been cut off (forgot to take a pic first!)
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Knob is drilled to take the thin shaft that comes out of the speedo base. I am using a centring bit to get the hole centred. Sorry about the blur...
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Job finished. Stainless MIG wire makes a good clip. Is stiff and won't rust.
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Headlight mounting mods...

"Bates" Headlight mount bolts are not only ugly and make cleaning difficult, but height adjustment also requires two spanners ie three hands.. two for the spanners and one to move the light...
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So step one is to use stainless button heads, step two is to stop the nut from turning... hmmm!!!

Solution is to create a locating lug on the nut by narrowing the rest with the angle ginder...

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Next step is to produce a matching notch on the edge of the bolt hole. Drill a small hole first...
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... then trim it out using a narrowed 24 tooth hacksaw blade... or cheat and use a die grinder like I have... then to make it nice and tidy for cleaning, get rid of the nut's hex shape with the linishing machine (Multitool).
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Final result, neat, easy adjustment, easy cleaning...
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Tool kit...

As I begin to assemble a bike, I collect and make/modify tools for a complete tool kit. In this way the rider will not be left on a roadside beset with a simple problem complicated by just one missing tool! The tools in thes pic are just the beginning, still need allen wrenches, screw drivers and a few more specialty tools.

On the picture below you will see a couple of spanners with red tape at one end of them. These are the sizes I have required so far and when the job is done, I will purchase the appropriate tools and add them to the kit rather than using ones from my workshop sets.

A number of the tools below have been made from scratch or use an existing tool as a beginning point. The 'T' shaped tool in the middle is a short piece cut of an allen wrench and bronze welded into some heavy wallled tube with a handle on top. this one is for removing the front tank bolt.

The top second tool from the left is for removing the primary chain inspection cap and also for clutch adjustment. The one underneath is plug spanner and the most left is their common arm made from some eliptical tubing flattened on one end to take the two tools. Cut off half of 'ring' spanner is very old. It is for a switch on right side of bike and is specially bent to clear oil tank. Using common arms keeps tool roll smaller and lighter.
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The following spanner is one example of a modified tool. The nuts on top of each fork tube and the steering head nut are the same size... and very large. Spanner needs to have a fairly low profile, so a socket is not suitable... if you can get one... The following spanner is made from an old open ended spanner. It needed widening by about 4mm... done with an angle grinder...
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Because it is thin, spanner jaws are likely to open under the strain of tightening the big nuts so the open end is locked using a piece of 3mm rod...

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With a bit more effort the spanner could have been turned into a ring spanner, but not necessary. This setup is quick and works really well.
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Have fun making your own tools and above all do it as you assemble your bike... much easier and less likely hood of forgetting that essential piece...

I would have had a whole lot up on beginning the wiring, but spent a couple of hours removing spammers on the forum instead.
Chopit'nrideit... Prof

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