31. Finishing & fitting swingarm...

A blow by blow photographic account of chopping from stock to chop... This projcet has been given its own forum due to the large number of photos it contains making uploading slow for those of you still on "dial up".
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Prof
Founder, Choppers Australia
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Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2005 3:54 pm
Location: Willunga, South Australia
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31. Finishing & fitting swingarm...

Post by Prof » Sat May 12, 2007 11:50 pm

Swing arm bearing mods...

The Sporty swingarm bearings are rather unusual. On the chain side, the bearing consists of a pair of opposing taper bearings. The other side has a simple plain bronze bush. This one is a bit of a worry as there is no way to lubricate it and no dust seals. See photo below...

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What I have decided to do is to add a grease nipple and channel the two bearing surfaces to allow the grease to be forced across the bearing surface.

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A hole needs to be drilled and thread tapped. You can obtain sheets that list and detail every thread including the suggested drill size for tapping. For example on this sheet you will note that a ¼" Whitworth thread needs a 3/16" drill...

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Always lubricate your tap. You can use oil, but threading or cutting compound is better...

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Once you have tapped the thread, clean off as much of the cut out metal as you can, before retracting the tap. This reduces chipping of and damage to the thread.

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I found a nice chrome grease nipple from somewhere...

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Here I've used a hacksaw to run a cut across the bearing through the grease nipple hole which should help grease move across the whole width of the bearing...

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This is shaft that the bronze bush rolls on. I have run two shallow spirals around it. This should help the bearing surfaces remain geased. Time will tell...

Shocker mounts...
The right side shocker bolt screws into the bottom of the chain guard which is threaded. I had meant to weld a thread onto the left side mount for that bolt, but forgot. Solution here is same as for headlight. A nut with a boss that locates on a slot in the mounting. Why do I do this? Because I hate having to hold a nut with one spanner while tightening the bolt with another. Where I can, I make bolting up parts a one handed operation...

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First step is to drill a hole to begin the slot... I got a bit careless and the drill slipped, chipping the paint... touch up needed!

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Slot has been made with a die grinder... Boss has been made on the nut by using an angle grinder to thin the nut except for one 3mm protrusion that will locate in the slot... (Apologies for some pics being out of focus. I accidentally bumped the camera on to 'telephoto')

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When using angle grinder to produce the boss, use a vernier to check that you have done it square or nut will not seat properly.

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An easy way to grind or machine nuts is to screw them onto a bolt wtih a spacer and locknut. Here nut is being ground round...

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Stainless steel bolts, nuts and washers are being used throughout the project, because they polish up so nicely. A thorough polishing will make them shiny as chrome...

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Here's the bolt and 'bossed nut' in place. Looks great, easy to clean, does up one handed...

Cleaning out axle adjuster threads...
Axle adjuster threads have paint in them , but their location makes it impossible to use the normal length thread tap to do the job. I could have bought a long tap, but there is a very cheap and simple solution...

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Make a simple extension with a piece of tube. This piece slides nicely over the tap body so I have slid it all the way down and then hammered flats in the tube to locate the square end of the tap...

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Then drill a small hole in the other end and tap a piece of thin rod through it as a handle. The hole is two drill sizes smaller so the handle is a very tight fit. Tap extension slides off the tap when you want to go back to a normal length.

Swingarm axle protectors...
Nice paint jobs are great... until you adjust the axle and then it chips and looks gross... so it's time to prevent this eyesore...

I'm using some thin stainless. A good place to get Stainless off cuts is togo to scrap merchants or stainless fabricators. I have worked out the dimensions and marked things out. The first step is to create 2½" x3/4" slot for the axle to slide through.

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Full length of slot has been marked along a centre line. Then using the vernier, I have come back in 3/8" from each end. These are the centres of the two large holes and in this pic have been drilled with a centrering bit...

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Centre bit holes were enlarged with a 5/16" bit and then a 3/4" bit used. In the first pic the stainless sheet is held with a G clamp. Blued Tacks, as used in this second picture are much more secure... and easy to remove.

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Centre piece has been very carefully cut out with my angle grinder (1mm blade) and then will be finished with a small grinding blade...

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Top and bottom edges are then folded, using two pieces of angle iron in a vice and a hammer to gently bend them over. Plate slips over swing arm nicely and is marked to be cut into final shape...

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Job done except to drill a small hole in the swing arm and dimple the s/s plate to stop it from shifting when the axle is moved. Looks pretty smick I think and all sorts of shapes could used instead of my simple arrow shape at the rear. I thought I'd try a spring washer with the axle adjuster lock nut, but I will use a flat washer in final assembly...
Chopit'nrideit... Prof

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