34. Pannier frame...

A blow by blow photographic account of chopping from stock to chop... This projcet has been given its own forum due to the large number of photos it contains making uploading slow for those of you still on "dial up".
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Prof
Founder, Choppers Australia
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Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2005 3:54 pm
Location: Willunga, South Australia
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34. Pannier frame...

Post by Prof » Tue May 29, 2007 10:46 pm

Pannier frame...

Michael wants panniers on an easy to attach frame.

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To expalin what we are doing, here's a pic of the almost completed job. Attachment points are at the shockers and one bolt on rear guard between sissy bar and taillight. A threaded piece of 5mm thick steel has already been welded to the underside of guard and runs through to rear guard mounts as reinforcing.
Shocker mounts are slotted so to install or remove panniers, top shocker nuts are loosened and bolt on guard is undone. The frame is of stainless to save painting, and chrome, and also because it is much stiffer than mild steel and so can be made with thinner (and lighter) materials...

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To bend steel accurately and especially in the case of stainless, neatly, cutting 1/3rd way through the material is the go... especially when bends are close.

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Finished bends... exactly the same... Gaps left from cuts will be welded later...

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Holes for shocker mounting have been drilled and slotted with an angle grinder and neatly rounded using method explained previously. Also a slight relief so bottom of bracket clears top corner of shocker. Holes for mounting panniers drilled and about to be tapped...

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Picked up this very "agricultural" bender years ago with some scrap steel. Works well for rod up to 3/8"... I plan to make one similar in futrue with a variety of sized centres and an adjutable guide bar...

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Put this pic in to remind you that when bending around curves you need to do a test bend and work out exactly how much extra rod is needed at bend to end up with accurate result... in this case, from a set point I needed an extra 35 mm. You can just see the texta mark along side the guide bar on the previous pic.

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You can use a carpenter's square to square up corners. If you don't want to buy one, make your own out of a couple of pieces of flat steel. I have made a couple of squares this way, the largest being 6' long.

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It's easy to twist your rod when bending, so line it up by eye or on a flat surface and then twist it back right!

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Using a square is the only way to accurately measure something like this...

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First bit of asembly done and bolted in place ready to be lined up for rear mounting...

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Bike has been levelled on the stand so we can use the level again to get the rear of both pannier frames at the same height...

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Rear mounting tab has been made and welded to cross piece. This pic to illustrate how weding on one side of a piece of steel rod, bar angle or plate, will BEND IT!

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Cross piece bent to meet pannier frames, bolted to guard and leveled... and welded... Note wedge used to hold it level while measuring for cutting and bending and then while welding...

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Final piece to make is small carrier over taillight. Curve needs to be bigger than I can get with my agricultural bender so am resorting to one used for heating and bending sissy bar with a slight addition... a bigger iron ring to give right sized curve. This curve bent without heat is not easy to get even and I have to do some free hand bending to get both sides of the curves right... the reason why I want to do an improved versoin of the agricultural one.

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And this old generator of my Fergusson tractor provided the right sized ring... Texta line is where it gets cut off. Nothing is ever junk... I just haven't found a use for it yet!

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Another view of the prefabbed job... just need to finish the welding and and give it a bit of a polish...
Chopit'nrideit... Prof

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