Josh's XJ600 #2.. Seat, Stand, guard brackets & 'first ride'

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Prof
Founder, Choppers Australia
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Josh's XJ600 #2.. Seat, Stand, guard brackets & 'first ride'

Post by Prof » Mon Jan 13, 2014 10:10 pm

Josh had two days up his sleeve, so last week hi XJ got a little closer to perfection...

First job was the seat. After considerable discussion, we settled on a shape that includes a decent lip at the rear to allow him to ride more relaxed without stress on his arms and wrists especially under acceleration and large bumps.

Aluminium pattern (1.5mm) was made, tested and slightly modified. Then it was flattened out and one side traced onto some 3mm ally.
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Next, a centre line was marked in and custruction lines drawn at right angles (perpendicular) to the centre line. Distances were measured and then tracing paper marked and then turned over to mark in the second side, using the measured lines as a double check...
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Ally now cut out with a jigsaw. Aluminium is fairly unforgiving and the saw needs plenty of downwards pressure...
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Next step is to roll the curve into the seat base. A roller is not essential; bending over a piece of round tube in a vice works quite well.
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Front mounting hinge will look something like this, It will pivot on the two stainless bolts. The threads need to be cut down, because longer bolts with some straight shaft are needed for a tight and long lasting fit at the pivot point. The stability of a sprung saddle is dependent on a tight fit in the hinge. The springs do nothing.
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Both side ears are measured and drilled as one piece... easier and usually more accurate than done separately.
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Being cut out. If you haven't made one for your vice yet, get a nice piece of angle iron and a G clamp so that the steel being cut can be be kept horizontal.
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Two ears cut out and clamped together ready for the linishing machine...
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Completed hinge. Round cross piece is threaded for the two bolts. The parts were clamped together for welding to give a close fit... ended up tight as a drum, but free to move. On final assembly, lock tite will be used to keep bolts at correct tension. We could have made stepped bolts, which is what I would do if it was my bike, but when building for someone else cost always becomes an issue.
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Spring mounts machined on the lathe. The smaller boss is a tight fit on the spring. Mount is threaded for a stainless button head bolt which holds the spring in place...
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In the background, you can see a mounted spring. Here we are measuring for the spring mounts which will actually mount though the aluminium. Measurements are double checked by measuring from a central point to each hole centre...
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Holes being drilled with a step drill. 3mm is about maximum thickness to drill in aluminium
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Spring mounts will be welded to this plate which will be fixed to the inside of the saddle. Small holes will be threaded for the 6mm bolts that hold the plate to the saddle..
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Here being curved with a bit of gentle persuasion on the anvil. Pliers is a must to save jarring your hand...
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Spring mounts welded in and the plate bolted. A spot of weld is placed over each bolt to prevent it coming loose.

Here you can also see how the front hinge is held in place. This 4mm threaded plate is held to the inside of the saddle by a pop rivet (purple arrow). This set up allows the hinge to be unbolted for upholstery etc...
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A look at the saddle from behind and below shows the tidy set up... sanitary we used to say!

The springs are not bolted in at their bottoms because saddle has to be lifted to access electrics box. Springs are pressurised against the lugs on the crossmember and hold on nice and tight, but still easy and quick to remove.
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The big test. Seat has been located to compress fully without hitting the guard... the reason for the length built into the spring mounts. The next size up of springs was too long and these slightly too short. Performs flawlessly.
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Next we'll tackle the side stand and then Josh gets a surprise ride.
Chopit'nrideit... Prof

Prof
Founder, Choppers Australia
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Re: Josh's XJ600 Seat, Stand & 'first ride'

Post by Prof » Tue Jan 14, 2014 4:27 pm

A standard Japanese side stand can not be used because the bike has been lowered, so the original stand has been removed and being a rather ugly piece of ironmongery, discarded. The original mounting tab has also been cut off because it is at the wrong angle and protrudes below the frame rail.

There are a couple of ways to do a side stand. One can be made from scratch with a hidden spring loaded catch... that's the neatest, but it takes time.

I pick up likely side sands at swap meets and pull one of these out of the pile. We have to e careful with placement because there is not a lot of space for the twin pipes each side. They need to go under the side covers which means they sit at about frame level. We need to also fit linkages to forwards and the side stand all without reducing ground clearance too much as it is now 115mm.

After a bit of discussion we settle on the original location as the frame tubes are reinforced at this point.

Here's the stand we have chosen to modify, still ugly but quite redeemable...
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First job is to block up the bike to a suitable lean. Note that this is done with the wheel is on opposite lock to ensure it will not fall over if the wheel is accidentally put on this lock. Piece of 50mm stainless tube is the planned size of the collectors and is used to check clearances...
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Stand now gets tidied up and the clevis closed up for a tight fit...
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Stepped bolt has been machined down to help keep as much space as possible for exhausts. The shaft of the stepped bolt is slightly too long so we temporarily add a shim washer. Later we will make a lock washer to save using a nut.. again to save some space.
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Foot of stand is removed and the stand will be lengthened. A long stand is stable and looks good. I have used a few triumph stands over the years The extended piece here being machined in the lathe. I have done it many years ago with a grinder, but it takes a lot of time and effort to get looking good. Gee lathes are handy...
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Joints chamfered and ready to butweld...
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Linished and bent with heat. You can also see that the mount has been cut back a lot. Here we are working out the angle it needs to be welded at to set the opened stand at the right height and for it to fold into the right position alongside the exhaust when on the move...
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Here's a shortened spring pin welded in place. Pin for other end will be welded in to match the spring we choose. This will be done later once the motor is out of the frame and the frame can be upended...
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Finished except for the spring...
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Well Josh was ready to go home, but a suggestion that we give it a test run was met with enthusiastic action. So we shifted all the tools and bits and pieces and pushed the bike out of the workshop and onto the street. Nice downhill slope means a hard push and he is off... no brakes but good thick soled shoes. He ends up doing three runs, the middle one he misses stopping in time and disappears over the humped bridge and down the road! He can't wait till he can ride it back not have to push... very enthusiastic and loves it.
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Chopit'nrideit... Prof

gsand
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Interests: Riding bikes.

Re: Josh's XJ600 #2.. Seat, Stand, guard brackets & 'first r

Post by gsand » Thu Jan 16, 2014 4:37 pm

That's looking very cool indeed!! Guaranteed to be a great little bike.

Are you going to shorten the headers at all? They areh hanging quite low

Prof
Founder, Choppers Australia
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Re: Josh's XJ600 #2.. Seat, Stand, guard brackets & 'first r

Post by Prof » Thu Jan 16, 2014 6:13 pm

Yes Glenn. Have tubing ordered for a pair of 4-2's. Headers will be cut and new bends will bring the pipes parallel and level with the frame rails. Poor Josh got a shock in the second run when I suggested he swoop back and forth to see how steering felt... headers hit the bitumen with a mighty crash!
Chopit'nrideit... Prof

Bearcx
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Re: Josh's XJ600 #2.. Seat, Stand, guard brackets & 'first r

Post by Bearcx » Sat Jan 18, 2014 6:08 pm

Brave man, riding without brakes.! Looking good, Josh.
The brave may not live long, but, the cautious do not live at all.

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