Medieval sissy bar...

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Prof
Founder, Choppers Australia
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Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2005 3:54 pm
Location: Willunga, South Australia
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Medieval sissy bar...

Post by Prof » Wed Oct 07, 2015 7:43 pm

Peter has finally purchased what he reckons is his final bike. Now he's customising it to his taste. Pipes done, he's now setting up a sissy bar for his wife (who refused to get on it until she has a decent backrest. They are heading off interstate shortly, so the sissy bar was the next priority.

After some discussion, he gathered and prepared his materials and came up as arranged on Saturday to see what we could come up with. We had a lot to do in a short time, so I apologise for some missed photos.

He used 16mm square mild steel bar which he put on a friend's lathe and added grooves every 50mm. He also has some mounts laser cut. Our first job was to weld them up and bolt them to the bike. (oops no pics).

He wanted to have the sissy bar and a small rack quickly removable and as tidy as possible. You can see what we did in the last tow photos. Four 1/4" bolts hold everything togehter.

Peter wanted an heavy blunt arrow head design at the top of the bar. We played around with a few drawings and came up with this.
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The concrete floor or a large piece of particle board are great canvasses and allow full size drawings.

Bending the inner curls of the arrowhead required lots of heat and a former. I had a former the right diameter which saved us half an hour. Getting both pieces exact required a bit reheating but they came out pretty much perfect. Peter made it a bit trickier for me with the lathe cuts in the square bar because they all had to line up including the curls...
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The arrowhead pieces also needed heat and bending in the vice. Any symetrical job always needs careful layout around a centre line and use of a square to get all the parts in their correct position. A piece of paper and a biro allows exact marking out. Note the chamfers where welding will be done. Once polished back, the joins will be 100 percent solid steel...
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Parts quickly tacked and checked. Welds can pull things out of alignment and did in this case. I had to cut one tack and re weld.
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Sissy bar mounted...
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To mount the sissy bar, the bottom 50mm of each leg had to be bent in slightly so they were parallel. This was done cold in the vice. He'll now make up a back rest and then we'll weld in some tabs for it...
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We pre-drilled sissy bar mounting plates to match holes in the carrier. It was now a case of drilling holes into the bar itself one at a time, fixing the bar in with a bolt and drilling the second hole. It took two to do the drillng; one to drill and the other to 'eyeball' the drill and make sure it was going in straight...
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For your interest, the total job took 6 hours. This included setting up the carrier whose mounting tabs had to be widened 30mm and the design work. Measuring also takes a significant amount of time in a job like this. By taking care with the measuring, you are more likely to end up with a first rather than second rate job.
Chopit'nrideit... Prof

Youngblood
Posts: 342
Joined: Wed Oct 24, 2007 1:48 pm
Location: North-Eastern suburbs- Adelaide

Re: Medieval sissy bar...

Post by Youngblood » Sat Oct 10, 2015 8:58 pm

The welds have been ground smooth and the sissy bar painted black (temporarily), to stop it from rusting. There will be some more welding required to fill in a few imperfections. I will do this when I get back from my trip interstate and by then I will also know if the angle and height of the sissy bar is OK. This will also give me some time to think about the backrest pads I need to make, the current plan is to make two pads. One for the lower back and one for the upper back, I want to leave a gap between the two pads for a couple of reasons. The two main reasons are a) when I strap things onto the sissy bar there are more points to attach the occy straps and b) it will allow some air circulation so the pillion won't sweat on the back as quickly and there are a few more minor reasons. I also need some time to think about how exactly I'm going to mount them to the sissy bar, decisions,decisions,decisions lots to think about. I never thought building a sissy bar could get so complicated and expensive but having said that it will be the only one like it. I'm already getting lots of positive feedback from people and people that know me say "it is so me" which makes me happy because I want my bike to be an extension of who I am.

:D :D :D
Youngblood

Bully_109
Posts: 9
Joined: Sat Oct 03, 2015 10:07 am
Location: Gracemere, Qld
Interests: Motorcycle customizing, DIY Mechanics, Riding, Choppers, Customs, Cruisers

Re: Medieval sissy bar...

Post by Bully_109 » Mon Oct 12, 2015 10:04 pm

Looks great so far fellas. Look forward to seeing the photos when its all done.
Interested to see how you mount the pads too.

Bearcx
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Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2007 12:31 am
Location: Gawler, Sth Aust
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Re: Medieval sissy bar...

Post by Bearcx » Tue Oct 13, 2015 12:15 pm

Youngblood wrote:people that know me say "it is so me" which makes me happy because I want my bike to be an extension of who I am.
Yep, This. ^ ^ ^ :D
The brave may not live long, but, the cautious do not live at all.

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