Shaun's GN650 tidyup for Regency

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Prof
Founder, Choppers Australia
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Shaun's GN650 tidyup for Regency

Post by Prof » Tue Apr 26, 2016 10:46 pm

Shaun bought this pretty GN650 in Queensland and coming down to SA to live , took it to Regency to see what he had to do to get SA regio. They told him... and promptly plastered it with a defect sticker!!!

Shaun took it to a couple of shops who showed no interest and found The Chopper Shed... willing and able of course.

List of jobs included chain guard, central mount tailight and number plate, high/low beam, horn. The exhaust was also loose and needed some extra support. We were expressly forbidden(understandably) to damage the paint work which led to quite a lot of extra work in a couple of instances. Paint is really beautiful and coupled with lots of copper plating is a really eye catching...
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Up on the stand for a close inspection and we find some interesting (read dangerous and/or inconvenient) approaches to bike building which we will attend to one at a time.
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First job is chain guard. The chain roller adds an interesting twist. It is mounted on the drag (top)side of the chain. It should be mounted on the bottom where the chain has more tendency to whip, and has less strain applied to it. How the roller will stand the strain remains to be seen and I warn Shaun to keep a close watch for bending and worn bearings. A quick sketch of the planned route of the chain guard...
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Heat up a piece of 30x5mm flat bar and bend it around one of my sissy bar formers...
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Cut some more 30x5mm bar and weld it to the curve...
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Finish with a file...
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Set up with a bit of extra shaping in position using some wooden blocks...
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Now for rear mount which we base on the theme already established and done on the exhaust side. A thread is needed and 4mm is not enough, so a nut is modified on the lather. This will be welded into the flat bar from underneath and provide and extra 4mm of thread =8mm for an M6 bolt...
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Finished nut on the left, counter bored mount and modified stainless bolt. Mounts on the rest of the bike are thin tube, a pretty slack approach, but this piece is machined with a decent wall thickness...
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Nut in place and ready for welding...
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Mount is tack welded in situ...
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Front mount is some more 5mm plate curved to follow the line of the existing roller mount...
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Rear mount welded and sprayed with copper paint to look the part until Shaun can get it plated...
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Painted chain guard. Sorry no pic of it on the bike...
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Next job is tailight/numberplate...
Chopit'nrideit... Prof

Youngblood
Posts: 342
Joined: Wed Oct 24, 2007 1:48 pm
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Re: Shaun's GN650 tidyup for Regency

Post by Youngblood » Tue Apr 26, 2016 10:55 pm

Looks good

8) 8) 8)
Youngblood

Prof
Founder, Choppers Australia
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Re: Shaun's GN650 tidyup for Regency

Post by Prof » Wed Apr 27, 2016 10:11 pm

Lighting was an interesting exercise. Lights came on with ignition, but there was no low/high beam switch. There is no requirement for lights to come on with ignition until the 90's, so we added a lights on/off switch. Reason for this is that if your alternator/regualtor acts up on a trip, your battery should power the bike for at least a day. However if lights are permanently on it will last less than an hour.

Wiring was rather confusing. When we exposed the wires in the loom to the headlight we found one of them stopping abruptly within the loom!

Anyway, Shaun supplied a mini high/low switch in a neat plastic handlebar mount. Only problem was the switch was an on/off rather than on/on switch...
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Unsoldering and resoldering a on wire solved the problem...
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Here you can see the neat little switch in its mount. We also had to add mirrors and used some cheap round mirrors in threaded handlebar mounts. Mini button switch is for indicators. The bike only had rear indicators. SA regs require front and rear indicators if any are fitted. Indicators are not required until 1988 so to keep costs down we left the switches and wiring in place but removed t he rear indicators...
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We mounted on/off light switch in headlight shell, a very common 50's and 60's location and very convenient. To keep to the regs we also wired in the high beam indicator. Speedo light was also not connected, which had they seen it would have caused the regio boys to keep on the defect...
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Wires in speedo soldered to extension wiring that goes into the headlight. Heatshrink is great stuff...
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To make it easy to remove headlight, I prefer to add a connector block through which all wires are routed.
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Tailight relocation revealed some interesting approaches to wiring a fab work.

Taillight/number plate was welded to the head of the axle! To remove the axle one would have to cut the wiring. Hmm not Kosher! We cut the wires and removed the wheel; and found the next interesting thing...

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The wiring was all bunched into a tiny space and was actually damaged by the axle adjuster being wound back...

and then discovered the the adjuster was fouling the indicator mounting bolt and the mudguard mounting bolt... the axle could not be moved backwards to tighten the chain. You can see one of the nuts up against the adjuster...
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One of the cut wires. Note horrible joiners. To join wires I only ever use solder and heat shrink...
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The adjuster actually needed to be turned upside down to work. Red arrow shows what was actually at the top and fouling the two nuts...
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We removed the indicator, but still had to trim the side of the adjuster to allow it to clear the guard mount nut. By the way, NO nuts we undid had spring washers!
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"Axle plate" was part of the original swing arm, a quite acceptable set up, but these were cut a bit short and didn't allow the adjuster to go forwards. Trimming off the front corners solved the problem. Both adjuster bolts were very stiff in the adjusters. We rethreaded both pieces and that fixed that problem...
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When we removed the guard we got the shock of our lives. The guard was held with 8mm bolts... screwed into the thin (max 1.6mm wall) frame tube. It allowed about one thread. I can't believe that anyone would do this. Nutcerts at the very least should have been used, though I prefer threaded bungs welded in. We weren't able to damage the paint work, so on this cross piece drilled through both sides and put in a longer bolt.. Not ideal, but the best I could do in the circumstances...
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Bottom of guard is 'secured' with these cool brackets... again M8 bolts screwed into the tube. Even worse we also discovered that the rear brake anchor was done the same way. Shaun told us later he had been riding the bike. The brake anchor bolts were quite loose. I doubt that he would have gotten another 50 miles before the anchor fell off with possible dire consequences. We'll show you later our solution and how brake anchor bolts should be secured...
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Here you can see the minimal thread in the thin tube... a definite no/no...
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Well, onto the tail light at last. Shaun bought a nicer light from us to go on top of the rear of the guard. He wanted the light to hang as low as possible, so we made this angled bracket here seen ready for final check before welding the cuts. Cuts were made to allow the bracket to be bent to conform to the rounded guard. A nylon spacer allowed the number plate holder to line up. The number plate will add 4" to the effective length of the guard...
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Here's how the light sits...
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Easiest way to find the centre of a curved surface is to use a piece of paper; mark the edges with a dirty finger and then fold the paper in half.
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Centre of guard now marked with suggested bolt holes (pencil, and paint marker spot)...
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Hole locations centre punched with an automatic punch, centre drilled and then drilled 9.5mm for 8mm bolt. This allows final lining up. Masking tape is supposed to protect paint work...
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Bracket is placed in position and marked through newly drilled holes with a texta (blue arrows). A piece of paper is again used to find the centre of the bracket (red arrow). Holes are then drilled and nuts welded on to act as captive nuts...
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Wires are run back along the guard in a piece of plastic that is glued in place with 'shoe glue'... real tenacious stuff. You can also see another way to make a captive nut with out damaging paint work. Pop rivet holding it in place is nut seen under the frame cross member...
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A couple of bullet connectors are added to allow easy removal of the taillight... Wires are cut very short to keep connection within the rubber cap that pushes over the back of the light... Note connectors are opposite so brake and taillight cannot be wrongly connected...
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Tail light finished. Number plate gives good extended cover to keep Regency happy...
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Horn, fuses, battery box mounting, brake anchor next
Chopit'nrideit... Prof

Bearcx
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Re: Shaun's GN650 tidyup for Regency

Post by Bearcx » Fri Apr 29, 2016 11:20 am

Far out !! Lucky Shaun is still alive, with some of that engineering.... Love the metal flake paint. Chop looks fantastic, aesthetically speaking. :D
The brave may not live long, but, the cautious do not live at all.

steve
Posts: 54
Joined: Fri May 05, 2006 2:25 pm
Location: Ipswich

Re: Shaun's GN650 tidyup for Regency

Post by steve » Fri Apr 29, 2016 12:32 pm

I am from QLD and there is no way known that the bike was legally registered in that form. I am not saying it was not registered but it would have been altered after registration.
In some ways it is good that regency would not pass it as it looks to be an accident waiting to happen. If things like this are presented to them regularly it is easy to see why they may get picky at times.

It is also lucky he found the right guy to fix it up.

Prof
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Re: Shaun's GN650 tidyup for Regency

Post by Prof » Sun May 08, 2016 9:20 pm

Thknks for the info Steve, unfortunately, Regency didn't pick up the really dangerous stuff (lack of adequate thread in particular) and I wouldn't have known if I didn't have to remove the guard or find loose bolts on the brake. I am still worried about the top mounted chain pulley, but as I never put them on can't comment from personal experience, but I have warned Shaun to keep a close watch on it.

Bike needed a horn and being an 80's bike could use a bulb horn, but Shaun chose this tidy little electric job.

There was a convenient unused hole just above and behind the foot peg just right for a little horn. Mounting it here meant we could cheat a bit on the wiring by picking up on the power to the brake light switch (blue arrow). Another unused hole a bit higher (red arrow) meant a short wiring run if it was used for the horn button. I asked Shaun about this and he was fine with it. Inconvenient perhaps, but how often does one need a horn. Who in a insulated cage with their bluetooth blaring in their ear would hear anyway?

In SA there is no requirement prior to 1995 bikes ( I think) to have the button on the handlebar and so Regency have no legal reason to object.

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When we were wiring the horn, I planned to run a wire from the accessories fuse... until I saw how hard it was to access wiring in the electrics box. It really looks great, but is time consuming to open. Two major problems with this particular setup were the regulator sitting in the bottom of the box, fully enclosed. Modern regulators remove excess voltage by converting it to heat and are finned to help dissipate the heat. they need to be out in the air flow. I usually mount mine under the oil tank or electrics box, but definitely not inside a box.

The second problem was that it was not possible to replace the fuses with out monkey fingers...
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A couple of wires pulled out of their terminals once we got fuse holder up this far...
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Costs were starting to go well above our initial estimation to Shaun, so we simply lengthened the two wires. As mentioned before, I never used crimped terminals unless in an emergency on the road. Had the wires been soldered they would not have pulled out...

Next job Shaun asked us to do, was to properly mount the battery box. It was held by two M5 bolts that were quite loose. No washers of course! Instead, we drilled two extra holes at 6.5mm diameter. Angle drill doesn't get used a lot, but one of those nesessary expenses that are indispensable at times like these...
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Even on high vibration bikes I don't use locktite. Grease is necessary for stainless fasteners, but I use it on all threads. Spring washers work fine...
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M6 button heads protrude a little into the battery box and will wear the bottom of the battery, so we cut a piece of 5mm rubber and tap with a hammer handle to mark the bolt head locations...
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Punch holes out and battery box is done. A leather belt is used to retain the battery and is cool, but old and cracked, so Shaun will need to keep a watch out on it...
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We've already gone through the axle adjuster woes, but the axle was about 4mm too long. the nut was actually pulled fully tight, but ws not pulling up to lock the axle. I would normally increase the thread and redrill the split pin holes, but it was quicker to machine up a brass spacer. A spring washer was then added, the nut pulled up and a split pin added to keep it all kosher...
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We had to remove the tank to run a wire up to the headlight switch and discovered that the cross over fuel pipe (totally unneeded on the tank by the way) was too short (only holding by about 2mm). I suspect it was not suitable for petrol and had shrunk (see blue arrow) and we replaced it with longer petrol-proof tube.

The tank was also rubbing on the backbone (white arrow)...
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The design of the rear mounts though great looking, is unable to support a full tank of petrol. The problem could have been solved initially by welding in a large washer (white arrow) to provide a greater bearing surface and prevent the mount being forced down. In the interest of economics again, we simply glued a piece of 5mm rubber inside the rear of the tank (sorry no pic)...
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Chopit'nrideit... Prof

Prof
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Re: Shaun's GN650 tidyup for Regency

Post by Prof » Sun May 15, 2016 9:29 pm

Here are the remaining things done to bring Shaun's bike up to scratch.

Brakes...
As mentioned, brake mounting was dangerous. I've never seen anything like this before. Rear of brake anchor used an 8mm instead of 10mm bolt and had no washer let alone a split pin which is an absolute must...
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Front of anchor had not lock washer and unbelievably consisted of an 8mm bolt screwed into thin (1.2 or 1.6mm) tube. It needs a welded in shaft that has a thread and place for a locking circlip or split pin. Both mounting bolts were quite loose adn would have come completely undone in a short time with possibly life and limb consequences...
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We used a brake pin from a CB750 for the rear. Sorry for the fuzzy photo but it has the correct size shoulder and a hole for a split pin...
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I used a 1mm cutting blade on the angle grinder to 'machine' back the alloy to lock the shoulder bolt...
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Because Shaun asked that the paint not be damaged, we couldn't weld in a fitting into the original frame hole. Instead we used the mudguard mount and made up a special bracket which you see here. A hole has yet to be drilled into the bolt for a split pin...
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Brakcet was made from some 1" flat bar bent around the right sized shaft using heat...
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The two ears were made from a 4mm thick bracket that we modified for the the job. Here you see a piece of pipe being used to mark the correct radius...
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Brake rod was no better mounted the the anchor... the bolts were the wrong size, had not washers or pins and were also quite loose. eEar mounting...
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Front mounting...
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Jake machined up a brass bush for rear brake arm and we pinned the bolt (bush here being installed)...
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Another trap for inexperienced players is the angle of the brake. Angle should be at least a right angle and preferably a bit more. The set up you see here loses leverage either because the the shoes are worn or because the lever was set up wrongly. We had to make a longer brake rod to allow us to obtain the right leverage. Have a look at this set up and consider how to adjust the brake?!. Looks cool, but a very inconvenient set up.
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We used the old brake anchor rod to allow us to obtain a better angle...
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Exhaust was dropping out of its join partly due to loack of clamp and lack of a supporting bracket. A stainless bracket utilising the guard/brake mount hole was made up to match the theme of the bike and a clamp was added..
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The tubes used for all the pretty mountings are all thin walled. Thicker walled tube should have been used or solid bar machined to suit the 8mm bolts. The rear muffler mount is pretty crucial, so we machined up a nut to fit the tube... and once again added a... spring washer!...
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The nut machined to fit the tube...
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Also forgot to mention an inconvenience with the battery leads... positive AND negative both marked black. We used red heat shrink over the poitive lead to avoid any confusion... (no pic)
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Shaun's bike finished and ready for Regency. Now pretty much built as well as it looks as far as we have been able to rectify things.
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I still think hard tail tubing is too thin and the mounts should use thicker pieces of tube. The old hole in the frame tube where the brake anchor used to mount needs to be carefully checked regularly for cracking and the rectifier needs to be mounted in the air stream plus a few other bits and pieces. I have gone through these things with Shaun, but this shouldn't stop him enjoying some great riding on this pretty little custom.

I have shown these things in detail for the benefit of builders and buyers, things that are traps for the new builder and for the buyer. I hope this helps us all build and ride safe chops and customs...
Chopit'nrideit... Prof

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