Today (Sept 19th,2016)... and a couple of weekends ago...

LOTS OF HOW TO CHOPPER PROJECT REPORTS... We build choppers the old school way... craftsmanship and artistry. Photos of our work to give you ideas... Aftermarket parts, parts for Shovels, CB's and XS's, our own unique parts for sale...
Post Reply
Prof
Founder, Choppers Australia
Posts: 5622
Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2005 3:54 pm
Location: Willunga, South Australia
Contact:

Today (Sept 19th,2016)... and a couple of weekends ago...

Post by Prof » Sun Sep 18, 2016 1:07 am

Had a quiet day today. Spent most of the day sorting and organising stuff, but still enjoyed the company of a couple of visitors...

Late morning, Jon came up to grab a 19" tube and get some help putting new tyres on his sporty wheels.

He'd discovered half a dozen broken spokes and had replaced them with some new ones. I pulled out the wheel alignment stand and showed him how to check for trueness. While he was at it I suggested he check the evenness of spoke tension. This is done by tapping each spoke with a metal rod. If they are evenly tensioned, they will sound the same. A higher tone means the spoke tigher than one with a lower tone. You have to do four revolutions, two for each side. One on the outside spokes and then one on the inside spokes on each side. You can see the metal rod in Jon's right hand.
Image

As you can see, he had fun...
Image

Late afternoon Chris rocked up to start playing with his GSX250. He passed his RDate test with 100% yesterday. Those of you who have been in Choppers Australia for some years will know Chris as passenger on many of our rides in earlier days.

I am always on the watchout for inexpensive smaller bikes to help the young lads start out in their biking careers. This little bike came from one of out members. Needs headlight,handlebars, front brake master cylinder, a battery and a good tidy up. He got the throttle working (was stuck) and added a battery and some petrol and she fired up briefly, but the carby bowls kept flooding, so next visit he will pull carbies off and give them a good clean.

We chucked on a set of flat bars I had for starters, but will sort out some higher bars for him to ride with. Bike should tidy up really nicely and he should be able to sell it for a good profit when he is ready to upgrade...
Image

During the week, I modified a seat rail for a customer's Indian. It had an aftermarket seat on it, so we had to modify the seat rail which I had gotten in for him from the US.
Two brackets fitted with slight bending by the other two brackets were cut off as they fouled the rear guard and seat rails...
Image

I machined up a couple of threads (forgot to take a pic) to be a slide in fit to the remaining pieces of tube. We retained them with a 2mm roll pin each. Using roll pins saves welding and chrome discolouration. Then a couple of short 20x3 stainless tabs that are held onto the bottom of the seat pan with TEK screws (he was in a bit of a hurry). If the TEKs come loose, he'll bring it back and we'll use a couple of nutserts.
Image

A couple of Saturdays ago, Rob and Terry come down. Terry is setting up a new pair of pipes for his xs650 and Rob wanted his low apes set up on his HD. The job involved lengthening cables and wiring.

When you need to join a bunch of wires in a single loom, cut each wire an inch longer than the previous one. Then when you join them the joins will be adjacent to one another and not create a bulge in the loom...
Image

Bolts holding the controls appear to have not been touched for a long time. A couple had to have their heads drilled out...
Image

... and then needed heat to loosen them. Threads were cleaned out with a thread tap and new stainless bolts installed. Note that we used a small alluminium spacer and the origninal bajo bolt to seal in the brake fluid while working on the master cylinder...
Image

Handle bars were very wide. Cutting a couple of inches off each end helped a little.
Image

A bit of measuring showed that we could remove 65mm out of the centre before the curves of the bars interferred with the mount...
Image

After finding the centre of the bars we measured out each way and cut the piece out. I machined up a piece of mild steel as a slug and welded the two halves back together. The weld will be covered by the handle bar mount...
Image

Final step in narrowing the bars was bending the bars so the uprights were more vertical. Sliding bevel gauge is used to get both sides the same...
Image

This handy tool is great for bending angled tube...
Image

Alan gets in on the act... (He has a Victory which he is chopping as funds allow.) We had to lengthen the throttle cable and I found a suitable length used front brake line ( I keep a pile on hand fo this purpose) to get Rob to a brake shop and get a new one made...
Image

Job finished Sunday arvo, and a very happy Rob (and Terry) ready to hit the road. It took a bit of convincing to get him to narrow the bars so much, but I called him after he'd ridden home and he absolutely loves them and finds them much easier to ride with than his original wide stock bars...
Image

The blokes stayed over night at Prof's Lodge. I stayed with them to watch watch a 70's biker movie (Born to Ride) then went an hit the hay. They ended up watching two more! Thanks to Paul for setting the video up. Screen can't be seen in this photo but is 8' high and 12' wide.
Image
Chopit'nrideit... Prof

Post Reply

Return to “The Chopper Shed”