Lace paint...

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Prof
Founder, Choppers Australia
Posts: 5622
Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2005 3:54 pm
Location: Willunga, South Australia
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Lace paint...

Post by Prof » Thu Oct 20, 2016 10:47 pm

The shop bike has been looking pretty rough as the years have rolled by. Jett was going to ride it with us in a long weekend jaunt, so I decided to give it a bit of a tidy up. I got Jake my workman to clean out the front brakes and put in a new stainless front brake line. This plus a new set of stainless apes we bent up made quite an improvement... but the tank is definitely not nice...
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Knee pad mounts also could do with removal. I felt sorry for Jett having to ride with such a sorry looking paint job...
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...so I decided late in the afternoon to give him something a little brighter...
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It is a real rushed job and will make our modern paint guru's have a fit, but is typical of what we used to do in the 70's. On more than one occasion I recall blokes rocking up on their bikes with a barely dry paint job, often having used lace, doilies, pieces of cardboard, so he could have something cool for that day's ride. One guy I remember got into trouble with his mum because he'd used the lace curtain in his bedroom for his 'on the spur of the moment' paint job!!!

Most of us hardly had enough moula to keep our bikes filled with petrol let alone pay for paint jobs. It was colour and difference that got our attention rather than finesse, though when we saw a professional flake paint job with twenty coats of clear, we did appreciate it.

Well back to my story.

The tank had some large dents, heaps of small ones, flaking chrome and some bad pitting on top. I had that night to get the job done, so cut back the knee pad mounts very gingerly with the angle grinder (Didn't wnat to get things too hot with a tank of petrol... not recommended!!!)

After a quick sand I got into it with the body filler. Light was bad and it was too much effort after a hard and long day to chase up some decent lighting, so the job was very rushed especially as I kept finding more dents just when I thought I was done...

A coat of primer followed 5 minutes later by undercoat really showed up the imperfections.

Hmm!! Well some lace work will hide most of it!

Grabbed the lace out of a drawer, worked out a colour scheme and got to work. Did the trick... as long as one don't look too close!!! I didn't even remove the tank from the bike, just used a lot of rags to cover everything up...
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I didn't take photos of the tank's progress, but the ext morning I stood back and looked at the bike, and decided the rear guard needed the same treatment and this time for your interest took some pics.

Here primed.... Then 5 minutes later, undercoated.
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For the colour scheme I picked adjacent colours on the colour wheel. ROYGBIV is the whole wheel. I used the Orange, Yellow, Green and Blue part.

Here orange and yellow. Just spayed one colour then the other... no time to wait for drying.
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Next, I laid the lace over the wet paint (so it would stay in place!)...
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and sprayed green...
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I cut out a piece of the rose pattern curtain in an smaller ellipse than I used on the tank and sprayed blue. Being in a hurry, I held a piece of cardboard to stop the blue going over the green and yellow side lace...Image

Lace removed from the top...
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Back on the bike...
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Paul, one of my regular customers ( and an ex auto spray painter) dropped by later in the morning and thought it looked pretty cool. I said it needed some pin striping... and he said he'd love to do it, so I got out some pin striping tape and he got too work...
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Well there you have it. Very striking and colourful (just like the 70's). It is a rough and rushed job, but if you take time and care, a paint job that not only grabs attention, but looks really 'outa sight' is easily possible.

But go to an op shop; don't nick the 'ol lady's' curtains!
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As it turned out, to have gone where we planned would have needed a four wheel drive, so Jett didn't get to ride it after all... but it sure looks great when I walk into the workshop each morning.

Really have to do something to my shovel tank. The batch of Dulux paint I used turned out to be faulty and has gone horrible. Hmmm!
Chopit'nrideit... Prof

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