Kens shovel; raked cups, forwards rear guard rehash...

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Prof
Founder, Choppers Australia
Posts: 5622
Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2005 3:54 pm
Location: Willunga, South Australia
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Kens shovel; raked cups, forwards rear guard rehash...

Post by Prof » Fri Dec 30, 2016 11:48 pm

Ken's latest project is an 8's shovel he purchased in a million pieces.

He brought it up to us for forward controls a tank and the installation of 3 degree raked bearing cups plus 6" extensions on the fork tubes. Aside from a very expensive kit you can buy from Germany that gives rakes up to 15 degrees, raked fork cups are the only way to add rake without cutting. Never use raked triple trees unless you have a true total rake of over 40 degrees. They reduce trail quite dramatically and trail is what keeps your front wheel running true and keeps your skin off the pavement.

Our first job was to set the frame up and check it was true. A simple way you can do this is illustrated here. A big sheet of particle board (not MDF) is levelled then has a line drawn down the centre. The frame is then set on the board and also levelled (with small wooden wedges if needed).

The centre line of the frame is found. On the shovel the swing arm is centred so a piece of duct tape is used to mark centre (green arrow) and a plumb bob used. Up front a plumbob (blue arrow) is hung off the centre of the steering head. both plumbobs are aligned with the line on the board.

75x35 building timber pieces are used to secure the frame to the board. To check steering head alignment, we use a laser I have built (, but if you are careful, you can use a straight piece of round bar or tube centred in the steering head. On this frame the laser point hits the line indicating a straight frame.
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The standard fork cups are tapped out with a hammer and drift and after a good cleanup of the steering head, the raked cups are installed using bearing mount to make sure they stay aligned. The cups have punch marks on them to help with alignment, but we again use the laser to get them perfect. A pipe wrench is used to get the alignment right. The raked cups are machined to allow the bearing races to be offset by 3 degrees. I have also used them to realign a slightly bent steering head, by setting them at a slight angle...
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Bottom triple tree installed. The custom triple trees that came with the shovel need modified steering stops to work on this frame especially now the the raked cups are in. Ken doesn't want the moulded neck area damaged by heat, so we machine up quite large stops and bolt them in with 3/8 socket head cap screws. At the bottom of the photo you can see part of the heavy piece of threaded bar we use to pull the bearing cups into the headstem...
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Paint scraped away so we see where the metal is and can mark up for four threaded holes for mounting a fork stop plate. Large hole is original padlock lug...
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Stainless plate folded slightly with a hammer over the anvil. Strictly speaking, only red hot material should be hammered on an anvil, so this one gets a fair old beating...
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Fork stop bracket threaded. I have done it this way because we are not sure of the tank Ken will use and how close to the steering head it will be mounted. The actual stop can be removed and shortened or a longer one put if if needed...
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Fork stop is locked in place with a lock nut. Here a standard nut is machined to half width...
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Bracketry installed. Once the chopper is on its wheels the stop will be barely noticable...
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Ken wants 6" extended forks. Extended narrow glide forks are increasingly hard to find and ones from USA are reportedly not hard chromed so wear very quickly. Slugs up to six inches are quite safe and will last a lifetime of abuse. To keep costs down, I have had half a dozen sets CNC'd, so have plenty in stock for anyone who wants them. When finally installed the join is covered by polished 11.5" stainless tube...
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Easiest way to installo the forks and wheel is upside down...
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Bike on its wheels. I advised Ken to allow me to rake the neck due to the height the chopper would sit, but his budget doesn't allow it at the moment, so we will at least drop the rear end...
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A simple solution to dropping the rear end is to use a rear drum brake shovel swing arm. The change over occured around 1971-72. The drum brake swing arm has the same length and axle spacing, but drops the rear by about 65mm. This is the original 71-82 swingarm..
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The earlier swing arm installed. It has been chromed by a previous owner and has a disc brake anchor mount. The guard will need raising and we will also modify the guard brackets so they remain level...
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Brackets are cut part way through and bent up then wedged and welded. All 'castings' on shovels are actually forged so can be safely welded...
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Ken tries the new configuration and is happy...
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Chopit'nrideit... Prof

Youngblood
Posts: 341
Joined: Wed Oct 24, 2007 1:48 pm
Location: North-Eastern suburbs- Adelaide

Re: Kens shovel; raked cups, forwards rear guard rehash...

Post by Youngblood » Sun Jan 01, 2017 1:15 am

8) 8) 8)
Youngblood

Prof
Founder, Choppers Australia
Posts: 5622
Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2005 3:54 pm
Location: Willunga, South Australia
Contact:

Re: Kens shovel; raked cups, forwards rear guard rehash...

Post by Prof » Sun Jan 01, 2017 5:25 pm

This is going to be a truly bobbed bike, so Ken gets to work trimming excess rear guard from the front and rear...
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... and the sides...
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While he is doing this I machine up a pair of threaded rear mounts...
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Everything is levelled carefully and the mounts welded in...
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Shovels have a second piece of reinforcing metal spot welded in. This one loses most of its spots so I bronze in around the edge for a strong and tidy finish...
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Front of guard sits too far forwards to fit the oil tank and battery box so it is wedged...
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... welded and trimmed. A carpenters square is used to get the end of the guard square to the sides...
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Bobbed guard mounted with a TCS tailight. Tailight is made from a vintage glass lens and piece of 50mm tube. A Narva globe holder slots into a washer welded into the tube which is slightly expanded to accept the lens. Regio plate is built into the package...
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With mag wheel it looks very late 70's...
Chopit'nrideit... Prof

Prof
Founder, Choppers Australia
Posts: 5622
Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2005 3:54 pm
Location: Willunga, South Australia
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Re: Kens shovel; raked cups, forwards rear guard rehash...

Post by Prof » Sun Jan 01, 2017 7:08 pm

The footpegs Ken has chosen are solid with grooves (normally for 'o' rings. He wants eventually to have brass ones made, but will do with these for starters. However he wants some skulls on his chopper and I suggested small ones on the end of his pegs to which he readily agreed...
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To match the pegs, I had Jake machine up some ringed toe pieces out of brass... with skulls attached...
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While I am working on another chopper, Jake makes up paper patterns of the footpeg mounts by pressing the paper against the mounting holes...
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He also machines up the shafts (17mm diameter) and control pivots. The latter are made from stainless. Each end is bored to take the plain bearings. The shafts are threaded on one end to screw into the mounts. The other ends are trimmed in the mill to fit the footpegs. The milled flats also allow a spanner to be used to tighten them...
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Shafts and pivots finished I mark out the mounts to be made from 12mm stainless. Paper patterns set out with minimum waste...
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Mounting holes are 3/8" (10mm) and shaft hole is 5/8" (16mm). For sufficient strength I like to leave 4-6mm of metal around the holes. So I set up the distance from centre on an 'odd leg caliper' and run a line that distance in from one edge. The centres of the two 3/8 holes will be along this line...
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One hole is punched and the distance between the two holes set with a calipers and and the second centre marked...
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Arrows show the initial two punch marks while we are now marking out the third hole...
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Hole centres punched, I now mark arcs around each centre where the bracket will be cut...
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Arcs are now joined by a straight line known in geometry as a tangent...
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Second mount is marked out the same way with the exception of finding the centre of the third hole. The distance off the pattern is measured (green line) and marked on the mount (crimson line)...
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The second distance is measured and an arc is then swung. The intersection of the two arcs is the location of the hole's centre...
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Mounts are not cut out until drilling and thread tapping done. This is because it is easier to clamp the work in a vice when it has parallel sides. Holes are now drilled and the shaft holes tapped with a 5/8 UNF tap. Great care needs to be taken keeping the thread perpendicular or the footpegs will slope at funny angles...
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Mounts cut out, linished and everything assembled...
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Chopit'nrideit... Prof

Prof
Founder, Choppers Australia
Posts: 5622
Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2005 3:54 pm
Location: Willunga, South Australia
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Re: Kens shovel; raked cups, forwards rear guard rehash...

Post by Prof » Tue Jan 03, 2017 11:38 pm

Next job are the gear and brake levers. Six inches (150mm) centre to centre is a standard measurement I use. If a bloke's foot is big I'll add another 20mm, but we'll settle for the standard on these. Diagram shows extra length added because 150 is the centre to centre measurement...

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Levers will be at a slight angle to the pivots so need to be bent to keep toe pieces parallel to footppegs...
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Toe pieces attached...
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Gear lever first. The 78-84 shovels had a double linkage....
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... which means the lever that activates the selectors on the castle top gearbox is sloped forwards. Over time a lot of slop develops with all these pivoting points. I dispensed with the double linkage on my shovel and everyone who rides it agrees that the action is excellent, so we will do the same for Ken's machine...
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Gearbox lever needs modifying to an up right position, here cut part way through and bent ready for welding...
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This keeps the lever at its most effective angle (perpendicular to linkage)...
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Length of corresponding tab on gear lever was originally calculated to maintain the same leverage, so I just measure the one on my shovel...
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Brake lever... Brake arm on the original mid controls is 220mm long. Because our arm is only going to be 150mm, we need to calculate the length of the tab that the master cylinder push rod is attached to...
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Centre to centre is 55mm...
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Ratio of original brake lever is 4:1, so when we divide 150mm by 4 we end up with our required length = 37mm (middle diagram). However I am aware that Harley always made their brake on the hard side to operate to reduce locking the wheel, so we will drop the length back to 33mm for a bit extra leverage...
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Levers have been welded onto the pivots, so I get Ken up on the bike and we set up gear lever and brake levers to suit his feet. Angle is marked with texta...
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Now to set up tab to which the gear linkage will attach. It is set up perpendicular to the linkage... another texta mark... On the other side, the brake tab is also set up, this time however slightly forwards of perpendicular so that it will be perpendicular when the brake is applied... the best leverage angle...
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Brake and gear levers done and waiting for Ken to polish them to a great shine...
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Just the linkages to do and then Ken can take his chopper home and assemble it. He'll be here Friday to do the linkages...
Chopit'nrideit... Prof

Prof
Founder, Choppers Australia
Posts: 5622
Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2005 3:54 pm
Location: Willunga, South Australia
Contact:

Re: Kens shovel; raked cups, forwards rear guard rehash...

Post by Prof » Wed Jan 25, 2017 7:17 pm

Ken realised that his gearbox is a ratchet top rather than the later castle top. He was originally told that his shovel was completely original 84 model, so something is not right so there is no point making a linkage at this stage. So I have suggested he come back when the bike is assembled and we will fab up the linkages then.

Last job on forwards is to mount the folding pegs. When you do this job keep in mind that your foot is approaching the pegs at an angle less than 90 degrees which means your foot will tend to slide off the pegs. Solution is to angle them up slightly to reduce this tendency. This often means slightly lowering the hole in the shaft to kick the footpeg up...
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To manhandle the chopper around means some handle bars. Ken wants pullbacks of some sort. These don't quite suit and tilt too far forwards for his liking...
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So we modify a set of experimental ape hangers I did up in stainless, but have some wrinkles at the bends. We cut the uprights and put in slugs, so he can get the pull back he wants...
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Here you can see one of the top pieces with a slug. The length is being measured and cut to suit Ken. Easiest way to measure across bends is to use a piece of angle or flat as is being done here...
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Bars now welded. To make sure they are square before welding we lay them on a flat piece of particle board and measure up to the tips... sorry no photo, but you will find a detailed explanation in a couple of other posts...
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Chopper has now been taken home with a temporary side stand bolted on at the rear. Frame paint will be touched up and motor is to be shortly reassembled. Ken says he will be back once that is done for linkages and a few other jobs. I have suggested he get the bike on the road with these bars and if he is happy with them, we will bend up a new set without the wrinkles.
Chopit'nrideit... Prof

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