VTX 1300... the works...

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Prof
Founder, Choppers Australia
Posts: 5876
Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2005 3:54 pm
Location: Willunga, South Australia
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VTX 1300... the works...

Post by Prof » Mon May 20, 2019 11:08 pm

After an extensive phone conversation Rick brought in his VTX1300 for some rear end changes. These completed, he is determined to go the whole hog with rake and extended forks.

But first, the rear end...

And man does that fat backside even need slimming...!
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I encourage my customers to be as involved as possible and Rick got into the act, first being to remove his shockers and rear monstrosity Honda calls a rear guard...
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I pop the shocker in the press and compress it to get a figure for maximum tyre movement for ensuring the guard has the right amount of clearance; 30mm on full compression, enough to clear even on a hot day at speed when the tyre is expanded, and not more than needed to keep our profile as low as we can...
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temporary strut made to mimic full compression...
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Rick wants a tall sissy bar, so the next step is mounting brackets off the rear subframe...
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They are threaded for ease of assembly and disassembly. Bike is carefully levelled...
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Good riddance to one fat bugga!..
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Police generally use 45 degrees as the cutoff point for rear guards although there are now no specific regulations about length...
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Once marked, use the square...
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I made this mount for for holding tanks and guards years ago and it has served me well. Valve compressor works a treat for holding the guard firmly...
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How high Rick? This high!..
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Rick wants an old school victory sign on top...
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A few suggestions drawn of the concrete and a V sign in a circle wins out...
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I point out that a good angle for a passenger and for looks and it looks best if it lines up with or close to the rear axle...
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Marking the 16mm mild steel round bar we will use. It will be welded to the top of the brackets we have made...
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Angle being set up...
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Heated to cherry red and bent in the vice. Sharp bent achieved by keeping the red area short...
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Two bent pieces laid together to check the bends and to make sure the lengths are identical...
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Double checking the centricity of the wheel between the brackets by measuring both sides; within 5mm...
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Cut to length for height and now the top couple of inches need to be splayed out so the circle can rest in them...
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Heated and bent and now areas to be welded linished to remove surface rust...
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Now for the circle. On old small fire extinguisher will suit the inside diameter as a former. If you are into chopping bikes, it pays to keep all sorts of nick nacks that can be pressed into service...
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16mm round bar is heated and bent around the former, cut and now needs the ends lined up. A piece of bar is placed inside the circle and used as a lever to pull both ends into alignment...
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Chamfered ready to weld...
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When bending with heat, you don't always get things straight, so the press is put into service to do a flattening job...
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How's it look guys? Rick is sold. Seb on the left has been our cameraman today. Been here having left France some months back. Sissy bar now lightly tacked...
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Now to get the thing central (ie straight up and down, not cockeyed). Bike is rechecked for level, tyre centre marked and plumbob brought into action...
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The two pieces of bar do not meet, so once centre of tyre is marked same gap is texta'd onto tyre and plumbob checked and rechecked...
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To keep three pieces in the same plane, we clamp a piece of 16mm melamine in front...
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Rick holds while I tack...
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Now the bar sides can be more securely tacked...
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Looks pretty cool just like this...
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Now to mount the guard. Chain is laid over the tyre. To provide sufficient clearance we slip a thick leather belt under the chain. Now lay the guard on that...
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Front of guard needs to just clear the swing arm of full compression so we slide a piece of 12mm timber on the swing arm and rest the guard on it...
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Find centre of guard using the folding paper method (see previous TCS posts), so we can drill holes...
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... for the tail light and wiring. EEk! Look at that enormous muffler!..
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Guard mounts on the sissy bar. Curved ends weld to the rear curve of the sissy bar (blue arrow). One reason for this is that the bracket will add strength to a potential weak spot in the sissy bar; the heated bend...
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Tack welding brackets. Cardboard used for marking...
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Nuts are bronze welded to keep assembly/disassembly easy. One thinner guards I weld in threaded bar to spread the stress, but this is a thick guard...
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Old and new...
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Sissy bar welded and checked on floor for twist...
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At this point, though late in the day, Rick is getting enthused about how cool his bobtailed machine looks except for those horrible muflers. Has a gander at muffler options. Decides to see how this lot looks and picks the turnouts...
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Slide them on the header pipes. Hmm! Very loud for Mr Plod. Some extra baffles needed...
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Long ones are chosen and will slide inside headers. Pipes are inch and a half, so the adapter ring is needed for the muflers which are incha dn three quarter...
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All nicely set up. Definitely better...
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Some half inch copper pipe welded inside the guard will keep the wiring out of harms way. I usually use plastic tube glued in, but Rick is riding home tonight and glue would not be set in time...
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Bent with this device...
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Missed a couple of pics. Number plate and taillight mount all made in one piece from 3mm steel plate. When he comes back we will make up a 3mm ally plate to reinforce the number plate, but this will do for now as darkness has set in...
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Side view shows number plate lights which Rick 'just had to have'...
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Small steel brackets for indicators as this is a post '88 machine....
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Now off the stand at last and let's see how she sits...
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Rick is stoked and now determined so save up some of that elusive paper called money and give it the full chopper treatment. He'll be here in three weeks so we can rake the front end. Keep posted.
Chopit'nrideit... Prof

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