Victor’s Shovel Chopper

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jsalt
Posts: 228
Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2012 10:47 pm
Location: aberfoyle park sa

Re: Victor’s Shovel Chopper

Post by jsalt » Sun Mar 31, 2019 7:41 am

Looks killer, Your work always looks good. I enjoy reading how you make stuff .
Jon
I hear voices and they have some good ideas!

Victor
Posts: 33
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2018 10:01 pm
Location: Adelaide
Interests: Building choppers and riding off into the sunset

Re: Victor’s Shovel Chopper

Post by Victor » Sat Apr 27, 2019 1:04 am

Thankyou Jon, glad you like it. It’s all a learning curve and the best way to learn is just to have a go! I’ve got a treat for you all this time

:shock:

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Back from chrome and looking stunning. This is triple plate chrome (copper/nickel/chrome plated). Good quality chrome isn’t cheap but it was made a lot cheaper by all my preparation. The chrome shop said it was a dream to work with and I made their work easy as! So I’d really hate to see the bill had I not done all of that work prior !!!!

Immediately noticeable is how easily it marks with fingerprints and grease. While I’m working on it all I’ve basically given up on cleaning it, and will just wait until all the work is finished before wiping it down.

On to the final jobs now. The end is in sight... finally.

Measuring up for an axle. The Japanese wheel uses 15mm axle, the original axle seemed to be just made of bright steel, nothing special. It seems weak but hasn’t budged in 6 years of hard riding , not to mention holding up a big twin Harley with me on top, plus the 30 ish years of whatever the axle and wheel was on before that, so that’s what we’ll stay with - 15mm bright bar.

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For appearance I will be using stainless nuts on both ends of the axle. However on one side the nuts will be locked down on the threads and secured with loctite. The idea is one side never comes off, so theoretically you can only lose one axle nut and not both :lol:

Makes for removing the axle a lot easier anyway.

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You may remember I intentionally drilled the holes in the fork dropouts oversize earlier on. Making the sleeve bushes for the shoulder bolts ended up being s little trickier than expected. They are mild steel and end up being about .8mm wall thickness. The sleeves first press onto the shoulder bolt , a job easily done in the Prof’s arbor press. The odd shaped piece to the right is the arbor used to align everything.

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Now the really fun part, getting them into the fork legs. Instead of pressing, I actually pulled them in using the threads and an aluminium spacer. Loctite bearing mount was used to make sure they don’t go anywhere in a hurry. Man they are in there TIGHT!

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Back to the bike now. Steering stem was reinstalled in the forks after cutting an extra 10mm of 1” UNS thread. Several benefits of having it removable, getting your measurements wrong is one of them! Bearings slipped on and the fork mounted up. Not for the last time yet though, I forgot to get the bearing dust shields. No problem.

You can see the preload nut and lock nut which is shouldered for the top tree. Once the top tree goes on, it leaves a small gap that gets shimmed to suit. Some might say this is a complicated method, but I am happy with it. Spare shims will live under the top nut if it ever needs to be adjusted on the road.

This had already been designed so all went together as expected.

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NOTE: the 3mm gap here will reduce to less than 1mm with the dust shields fitted.

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These stem nuts will be replaced with stainless soon. 1” UNS stainless nuts needed to be ordered in specially but mild nuts are fine, just not resistant to rust.

I made new spring rods in 16mm stainless round bar. They are inside the springs so plain steel rods will rust and require full dissasembly to keep looking good. These are stepped down for threads on each end.

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Couldn’t resist getting the wheel in there with washers for spacers. Pretty stoked!

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Right. At this stage I could be done, but spool wheels are not really acceptable and I actually like having a front brake.

This is the front brake cam and a bushing made of nylon. I would have used Delrin but didn’t have any. I’ll replace it with Delrin in the future.

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Bronze bushings machined for the floating brake plate. A necessity on a springer is for the brake plate to rotate freely with the axle done up proper tight.

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Expanded. Bronze top hat bush, bronze washer bush, wheel spacer ( actually goes on the other side of the hub) , and axle flange nut. Will top off with a dome nut also.

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Apart from actually fitting inside the springer legs, it looks a million times better than the original cast brake plate.
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Next up is the brake torque arm. I wanted to do something to try something new here and had a go at hammered stainless. This is just done with a ball peen hammer onto the steel over an anvil (my “anvil” is a piece of railroad track.

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What’s with the plumbing fitting?? Well I didn’t have any bronze in the workshop, and I’m out of Delrin too but still wanted to get this thing going for now. So here’s a couple of brass bushings turned out of $1.50 bunnings fittings. Will do fine until I can replace with bronze.

Bushing gets sandwiched between two washers with a bolt through the middle. Simple tech that works.

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Turns out to be too wide to clear the front leg at full droop, but these bolts are just temporary and will be replaced with stainless Button head screws that will clear fine.

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There you go. Brake and wheel mounted.


Next I need to make a new brake actuating arm and brake cable. And of course handlebars!

Here’s the template of the bars in welding rod. Welded pullbacks that I will make from1”x.120 DOM. I’ll polish the steel and clear coat for now, until I can either get the bars chromed or duplicated in stainless. A bit hard to visualise perhaps but it’s all good in my mind.

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jsalt
Posts: 228
Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2012 10:47 pm
Location: aberfoyle park sa

Re: Victor’s Shovel Chopper

Post by jsalt » Sat Apr 27, 2019 7:47 pm

Oooooh It’s pretty !!! So shinny
At least the finger prints will wipe off,
The wife made me paint most of the inside of my house a shade of white . She yells ‘are your hands clean’ every time I walk inside the house due to full hand prints I leave on the walls😬😁.
I hear voices and they have some good ideas!

Prof
Founder, Choppers Australia
Posts: 5860
Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2005 3:54 pm
Location: Willunga, South Australia
Contact:

Re: Victor’s Shovel Chopper

Post by Prof » Sun Apr 28, 2019 10:03 am

Same probs with white carpets. Lose the relaxed atmosphere one is supposed to have in a home! Bit like a chopper that is too shiny and has an expensive paint job... gotta be real fussy with where and when you ride.

Springer and especially that backing plate sure looking good.
Chopit'nrideit... Prof

El Skitzo
Posts: 760
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2009 6:40 pm
Location: Perth, WA

Re: Victor’s Shovel Chopper

Post by El Skitzo » Mon Apr 29, 2019 10:56 am

How stunning does that looked chromed! 8)
'65 Triumph Chopper (project)
'64 Triumph Chopper (project)

Victor
Posts: 33
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2018 10:01 pm
Location: Adelaide
Interests: Building choppers and riding off into the sunset

Re: Victor’s Shovel Chopper

Post by Victor » Mon Apr 29, 2019 5:54 pm

Thanks guys.

It happens to the best of us, and it’s not always our fault, honest!!! If I’m working for a short period in the shed I’ll often wear work gloves. I prefer the bare hands approach for dexterity (unless welding or doing heavy grinding) but it needs to be a full day to justify the clean up afterwards :lol: :lol:

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